Credentialing is complicated

Credentialing is not only time-intensive, it is complicated and confusing. What are the steps? Do you have all the documentation? Have the regulations for credentialing changed again? It’s enough to make your head spin, and, of course, there is too much at risk to let the process to be anything less than absolutely perfect.

Successful credentialing requires complete, attentive assessment and knowledgeable staff versed on the ins-and-outs of the extensive and complicated requirements. To break it down, there are generally two tiers of the credentialing and privileging process. Tier one includes verification or primary credentials and competence, including the steps between application, verification of credentials, evaluation of core competencies and a Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE) if the physician applicant lacks competency documentation.

Tier two includes delineation of privileges, appointment and reappointment. This tier can include six steps even more complex than those in tier two with the involvement of evidence-based methodologies, credentials committees and executives committees.

It should come as no surprise that credential applications frequently have errors or cause major headaches for hospital and physician practice staff –to no fault of their own, other than simply not having the time or experience to complete the process seamlessly.

The solution? Many times working with an outside source can be the best option for credentialing physicians. Relying on a knowledgeable vendor who is not only devoting the time and dedicated staff, but who is also taking on the responsibility for assuring the accuracy of credentialing, can save your hospital or practice valuable time, resources and money that can otherwise be devoted elsewhere.  While credentialing is no less important than scheduling, for example, it offers an incredible, special challenge requiring time and know-how.

Advertisements

Start a Discussion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s